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Sep. 6th, 2013

готфруа

lehire

The Cambridge History of the Crusades (forthcoming 2015)

To my knowledge, the first two volumes of this multi-volume work, entitled respectively, Sources, Conquest and Settlement (eds. M. Bull and Th. Madden) and Expansion, Impact and Decline (eds. J. Phillips and A. Jotischky), will be published by Cambridge University Press in 2015.
Does anyone have more information on the matter?

Jun. 2nd, 2013

Anne of Cleves

eulistes

CFP: New College Conference on Medieval & Renaissance Studies 2014

*****CALL FOR PAPERS******

The nineteenth biennial New College Conference on Medieval and Renaissance Studies will take place 6–9 March 2014 in Sarasota, Florida. The program committee invites 250-word abstracts of proposed twenty-minute papers on topics in European and Mediterranean history, literature, art, music and religion from the fourth to the seventeenth centuries. Interdisciplinary work is particularly appropriate to the conference’s broad historical and disciplinary scope. Planned sessions are welcome; please see the new guidelines at http://www.newcollegeconference.org/cfp.

In memory of the conference’s founder Lee Daniel Snyder (1933–2012), we are pleased to announce the establishment of the Snyder Prize, which will be awarded for the first time in 2014. The prize carries an honorarium of $400 and will be given to the best paper presented at the conference by a junior scholar. Further details are available at the conference website.

The conference will be held on the campus of New College of Florida, the honors college of the Florida state system. The college, located on Sarasota Bay, is adjacent to the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, which will offer tours arranged for conference participants. Sarasota is noted for its beautiful public beaches, theater, food, art and music. Average temperatures in March are a pleasant high of 77F (25C) and a low of 57F (14C).

More information will be posted on the conference website as it becomes available, including submission guidelines, prize details, plenary speakers, conference events, and area attractions:

http://www.newcollegeconference.org

The deadline for abstracts is 15 September 2013. Send inquiries to info@newcollegeconference.org and abstracts to:

abstracts@newcollegeconference.org

PLEASE SHARE THIS ANNOUNCEMENT WITH INTERESTED COLLEAGUES.
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Nov. 28th, 2012

Unicorn

a_little_wisp

A Terrified and Floundering Newcomer

Hello, medievalists!

I just spent two hours hitting the "Previous 10"! What an informative and friendly community I've stumbled upon!

I am so, so thankful to have found you all. And I hope that you can help me!

Let be begin by stating that I've been interested in medieval literature since AP English in eleventh grade. Every class I took at university with a focus in medieval studies just confirmed that THIS -- this was what I wanted to immerse myself in for the rest of my days. In particular, my heart throbs over the linguistic aspect. I really, really like grammar (I'm praying that no one finds a billion typos in this now). And I really, really enjoy languages in general! I've taken two semesters of Latin (before the subject was CANCELLED -- unbelievable!) and many long years of French, from high school and into college. I am more interested, however, in Old Norse, and I wish that I had taken German instead of Latin or French. Gosh, I'd die to learn Welsh! ... Maybe not die.

Okay, so this is why I'm terrified and floundering:

I'm low on funds. I've been low since I've started paying back student loans and the rest of life's bills (relatable, I'm sure). So I'm taking my GRE late and applying to grad school late, and will probably be broke by the time January rolls around. But I think it's worth it. Oh lawd, I hope it's worth it.

I'm trying to be very careful about where I apply. I graduated with a 3.66 GPA, and while I didn't do much volunteering, I was a writer for our university's magazine, and my poetry was featured in our annual literary journal. I've had a rough undergraduate career simply due to the fact that I changed majors twice and transferred schools once. Really, when I look at myself, I see a lot of passion but very little to show for it.

And yet still, I want to get into a good school. I also want to be realistic about it. So far I've looked into the Medieval Studies/Literature programs at Purdue, Western Michigan, Oregon, and a few others. I can only apply to a few-- it's honestly all I can afford. I'd love to study abroad but that's moving into the territory of "in your dreams". Can any of you pros offer any input on the situation or suggest any other schools that might be more suited for my interests?

All the best to you wonderful people, and I hope your holidays are off to a grand start! Thanks for reading!

Jan. 25th, 2012

beowulf

ashkitty

CFP: Hortulus 2012 "Space and Place"

Hortulus: The Online Graduate Journal of Medieval Studies

Special Call For Papers for Issue on Medieval Space and Place

SUBMISSION DEADLINE FOR VOLUME 7, Issue 1: 1 March 2012


Hortulus: The Online Graduate Journal of Medieval Studies is a refereed journal devoted to the literature, history, and culture of the medieval world. Published electronically twice a year, its mission is to present a forum in which graduate students from around the globe may share their ideas. Article submissions on the selected theme are welcome in any discipline and period of Medieval Studies. We are also interested in book reviews on recent works of interest to a broad audience of Medieval Studies scholars.

Recently, place and space theories have manifested themselves in Medieval Studies in a number of ways, from analysis of specific spaces and places, such as gardens, forests, cities, and the court, to spatially theorized topics such as travel narratives, nationalism, and the open- or closedness of specific medieval cultural areas. Over an array of subjects, the spatial turn challenges scholars to re-think how humans create the world around them, through both physical and mental processes. Articles should explore the meaning of space/place in the past by situating it in its precise historical context.

Possible article topics include, but are not limited to:

Medieval representations of spatial order
The sense of place in the construction of social identities
Mapping and spatial imagination
Topographies of meaningful places
Beyond the binary of center/periphery
Spatial policies of separation: ethnicity, religion, or gender
Travel and the sense of place
Creating landscape
The idea of place in medieval religious culture
Pilgrimage
Workplaces Intimate space, public place
Liminality and proximity as social categories

The 2011 issue of Hortulus: The Online Graduate Journal of Medieval Studies will be published in May of 2012. All graduate students are welcome to submit their articles and book reviews, or to send their queries, via email to submit@hortulus.net by March 1, 2012. For further information please visit our website at www.hortulus.net


Hortulus: The Online Graduate Journal of Medieval Studies, www.hortulus.net
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Sep. 20th, 2011


w_ockham

The Phantom Time Hypothesis

I'm writing a paper on the "Phantom Time Hypothesis".  You can Google this, or refer to this paper by Niemitz http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/volatile/Niemitz-1997.pdf, or this by Illig http://www.bearfabrique.org/Catastrophism/illig_paper.htm, or this article about it on the BBC website http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/classic/A84012040. Briefly, the hypothesis is that in order to reconcile the difference between the Julian and Gregorian calendar, we have to remove 300 years from the 'official' calendar.  Illig reckons these years would be 614-911.  Thus many popes, emperors, wars &c never existed.  The hypothesis explains this as a massive conspiracy.  The entire history of that period was invented by Holy Roman Emperor Otto III, whose conventional dates are given as 980 –1002, but who really lived 300 years before that, from about 680 to 702.  However, in connivance with Pope Sylvester II, he decided to convince everybody they were living at the end of the First Millennium, because it was a wonderful opportunity for positive PR, and Otto liked the idea of reigning in the Year 1000. “It was such a nice, round number”.  He changed the dates, and got scribes to write an extra 300 years of history.   

I have my own ideas about this but welcome the thoughts of people here.  In particular, I am interested in how ordinary people in the early middle ages actually recorded years.  Did they really rely on priests to tell them the time (it is essential to the hypothesis that the whole Church was involved in the conspiracy)?  Or did they record dates and years in their own way?  How often did official documents record the exact date?

My only knowledge of reference to dates is Bede, who includes a whole chronology of the world in his book on the English Church and people.  (However, Bede was living right in the middle of the 'phantom period' so perhaps his works were a later forgery).

Thanks

Edward

Sep. 7th, 2011

tank girl molotov

k_navit

postdoc for a "digital medievliast"

Dear Colleagues:
I know it is very late in the game
for this kind of posting, but circumstances are such that I am looking
for a post-doc research fellow for the T-PEN project for immediate hire.
 At this point, residence in St Louis is negotiable (although the
successful candidate must already be able to work legally in the USA).
 Feel free to share the details with everyone and anyone. 
Jim
__________________________
Saint
Louis University, a Jesuit Catholic institution dedicated to education,
research, healthcare and service, seeks applications for a full-time,
limited contract, Research Fellow (Senior Research Assistant) in the
Center for Digital Theology. The successful candidate will join a
research team which is developing a web-based application in digital
humanities: T-PEN (Transcription for Paleographical and Editorial
Notation) is a web-based tool that assist scholars who wish to
transcribe from digitized, unpublished manuscripts. T-PEN has been in
development for a year, and the new Research Fellow will contribute to
its completion over the next year. Details of the project may be found
at digital-editor.blogspot.com

Reporting to the Principal Investigator, the Research Fellow
works alongside a Java Developer and GUI Developer as well as the
project's other Co-PI, Professor Abigail Firey (University of Kentucky).
The Research Fellow contributes to T-PEN's general development (which
features to create or modify, how to make the application more usable,
etc.), participates in bug reporting and usability testing, attends
weekly staff meetings, and executes a transcription project that will
act as a major use case for T-PEN. That project will be based on one or
more the 2,600 manuscripts that T-PEN currently has permission to use,
which are drawn from five partnering digital repositories (Parker on the
Web, e-codices, CEEC, Hougthon Library [Harvard] and Assisi). The
Research Fellow will publish a working digital edition of the text based
on the transcription work using T-PEN throughout the academic year. The
Research Fellow also contributes posts to T-PEN's blog and must be
willing to "tweet" about the project on a regular basis on Twitter.


The successful candidate will possess a doctorate in medieval studies

(or a single humanities discipline with a medieval research focus) and
will have strong, demonstrated skills in paleography and Latin and/or a
medieval vernacular language. Some experience in text editing would also
be an asset. The successful candidate must have demonstrable experience
in the digital humanities (such as digital text editing, software
development, digital image analysis, database development, etc.).
Experience with XML encoding would also be an asset. (S)he must also
possess strong interpersonal skills, be able to work in a team
environment, and be able to work to set deadlines. The position will
begin immediately upon hire and will terminate on 30 April 2011. The
annual salary will be $40,000, paid on a monthly basis. The position
includes medical and other minor benefits.


Summary of Qualifications

Required

- PhD in Medieval Studies (or a single humanities discipline with a medieval research focus)
- Demonstrated skill in Paleography and Latin (and/or a medieval vernacular language) 

- Demonstrable experience in digital humanities
- Strong interpersonal skills and the ability to work in a team environment
- Able to work to set deadlines

Desirable
- Experience in text editing
- Experience with XML encoding

Applications are to be submitted on line at http://jobs.slu.edu.
Please include a letter of application, a CV, a list of URLs of
previous projects or a sample written piece that engages the methods of
digital humanities, and a list of three referees. Potential applicants
are welcome to contact Professor James Ginther, Director, Center for
Digital Theology, for any additional information at ginthej@slu.edu.


Saint Louis University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity

Employer and strongly encourages applications from women and minority
candidates.

--
----------
James R. Ginther, PhD

Professor of Medieval Theology
& Director,
Center for Digital Theology
Saint Louis University
-------------------------
ginthej@slu.edu
Faculty Page: Departmental Page

Research Blog: http://digital-editor.blogspot.com
Twitter: DH_editor

Jul. 4th, 2011

sketch

lenticular

PhD

Hello all,

I'm new here. I am considering applying for a PhD program dealing with Medieval Manuscripts. The topic is wide open and I'm curious if anyone can lead me in the right direction to topics that are of current interest in Medieval Studies?

I have reviewed many online exhibitions and I have also come up with a few topics only to research and find that a great deal has already been covered on that topic.


Any help would be greatly appreciated.


Lenticular

Jun. 23rd, 2011

Books

eulistes

CFP: New College Conference on Medieval & Renaissance Studies 2012

*****CALL FOR PAPERS******

The eighteenth biennial New College Conference on Medieval and Renaissance Studies will take place 8–10 March 2012 in Sarasota, Florida. The program committee invites 250-word abstracts of proposed twenty-minute papers on topics in European and Mediterranean history, literature, art, and religion from the fourth to the seventeenth centuries. Interdisciplinary work is particularly appropriate to the conference’s broad historical and disciplinary scope. Planned sessions are welcome.

The conference will be held on the campus of New College of Florida, the honors college of the Florida state system. The college, located on Sarasota Bay, is adjacent to the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, which will offer tours arranged for conference participants. Sarasota is noted for its beautiful public beaches, theater, art and music. The average temperatures in March are a pleasant high of 77F (25C) and a low of 57F (14C).

More information will be posted on the conference website as it becomes available, including plenary speakers, conference events, and area attractions: http://faculty.ncf.edu/medievalstudies

The deadline for abstracts is 15 September 2011. Send inquiries and abstracts (email preferred, no attachments please) to:

nmyhill [at] ncf.edu

Nova Myhill
Division of Humanities
New College of Florida
5800 Bay Shore Road
Sarasota FL 34243

***Please share this announcement with interested colleagues.***
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Apr. 19th, 2011


qu0thraven

"John Donne" by Ben Jonson

ARUGH!  (sorry, need to vent.)

So I am doing a paper on the above mentioned poem; trying to tease out its story. 

I know that Jonson and Donne knew each other, have found many snippits that confirm this, but cannot find out any more about this relationship. 

I know that Jonson criticised Donne pretty harshly at times, but other than about 2 or three separate sentances, I cannot find out more. 

I know that he wrote this poem but cannot find out why or any commentary on it. 

I know that I need to improve my research skills but the few times I have tried my "ask the librarian 24/7" doesn't seem to be working. 

Luckily my paper is short so I probably have enough to do the paper.  But I want to know MORE.  I am  _really_  interested in this. 

(end vent) 

Thanks, I feel better.  Just wanted to express this somewhere I thought it might be understood.

Mar. 18th, 2011

Athena of Pireus

fpb

big fat history book - YOURS FOR FREE!

- um, if you can read Chinese and use big fat .pdf documents. I have a beautiful e-copy of THE CAMBRIDGE HISTORY OF THE MIDDLE AGES in Chinese which I don't need, but would hate to have to delete. Anyone who asks can have a copy.

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